Students and Faculty Come Together to Conclude Russian Winter Arts Festival

Students and Faculty  Come Together to Conclude  Russian Winter Arts Festival

The chapel vibrating as sound bounced  out of the piano was a magical experience. On Thursday, Dec. 3 and Friday, Dec. 4 the Russian Winter Arts and Music Festival continued from earlier in the semester. The first night featured student performances, showcasing Will Platt ’19, Justin Winokur ’18, Mitch Paro ’16, Andrew Shaw ’16, Claire Raizen ’18 and faculty accompaniment by Tony Lin and Christine Coyle. This was a particularly fun performance because of the variety of instruments and styles featured. Platt and Lin, playing violin and piano, respectively, opened…

Returning to Walden

Returning to Walden

As our winter break draws near, many of us are probably thinking about the ample free time to finally read for pleasure. The question of what books to read will undoubtedly come up, and for that I have a solution. Take a few days to return to one of those Great American Classics and think critically as you follow Henry David Thoreau on his two-year excursion to Walden Pond near Concord, Massachusetts. If you had to read Walden for an idealism or nature course in high school, now is a…

W.G. Sebald’s The Emigrants

W.G. Sebald’s The Emigrants

W. G. Sebald (1944-2001) was a German writer, academic and emigrant. Though his written language was German, he taught only in England and held positions at both the University of Manchester and the University of East Anglia. He wrote four novels (and supervised their translation into English), as well as a number of poems, essays and short stories. Though Sebald’s career was relatively short, having written his first novel only 11 years before his early death in a car accident in 2001, his work earned and continues to earn substantial…

Divestment: The Price of Clean Money

Divestment:  The Price of Clean Money

In 1988, a group of Connecticut College students urged a motion for the college endowment portfolio. Its goal was to get the College’s money out of apartheid South Africa in order to undermine the then apartheid regime. After contentious debate that resulted in the resignation of trustee Barry Bloom, the Board resolved not to further invest in companies doing business in South Africa. “I have resigned as a Trustee of Connecticut College in order to protest the adoption of this ill-considered divestment policy,” wrote Bloom in a Letter to the…

Unique Study Spaces to Consider

Unique Study Spaces to Consider

On Campus! Hillel House – Located in North campus, near the Winthrop Offices and Earth House. There are study spaces on both levels, with comfy couches, games, and a television downstairs (for a well-deserved study break of course)! Harris Atrium – Above the entrance to Harris Refectory, there are tables and corrals lit by a glass ceiling. Warm, sunny, and close to food! Dorm Common Rooms – A classic. And don’t worry, you’re welcome in any common room on campus! Feel free to occupy the spaces that are not yours,…

Prominent Writers Debate Free Speech

Prominent Writers Debate  Free Speech

Connecticut College hosted writers from The Atlantic and The New Yorker on Dec. 3 for an educational and insightful conversation regarding the relationship between race and free speech on college campuses. Jelani Cobb of The New Yorker criticized the invocation of the First Amendment as a defense of discriminatory and destructive speech, while The Atlantic’s Conor Friedersdorf warned against the unintended consequences of instating speech codes as a protective measure. The dialogue was moderated by John Dankosky, the vice president of news at the Connecticut Public Broadcasting Network. Calling the…

“The Half Has Never Been Told”

“The Half Has Never Been Told”

On Dec. 7 in Blaustein 210, Cornell University Associate Professor of History Edward E. Baptist examined the concurrent evolution of slavery and American capitalism. The lecture, which highlighted the findings presented in Baptist’s 2014 book, The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism, diverged from the more conventional theses of many contemporary historians. Analyzing the testimonies of enslaved people and enslavers, as well as statistics on total cotton output from the Revolution to the Civil War, Baptist asserts, “enslavers created a diabolical system that is…

To Fundraise, Conn Students “Take the Plunge”

To Fundraise, Conn Students  “Take the Plunge”

On Dec. 5, 2015, Connecticut College’s chapter of Oceana, a student club that raises awareness about the importance of protecting the world’s oceans, held its fourth annual polar plunge at Ocean Beach in New London, Connecticut. As tradition dictates, participating students ran into the chilly Atlantic Ocean while other students supported their peers from the shore. Students were encouraged to donate at least $5 to participate in the plunge. “Non-plunging” students could also donate money to the cause by supporting friends. According to a post written by CC Oceana to…

Letters from Paris: Students’ Stories of Terrorism

Letters from Paris:  Students’ Stories of Terrorism

On Jan. 7, 2015, twelve people were killed in Paris when Islamic extremists responded violently to a depiction of Muhammad by French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. The attack was profoundly jarring for the French people, and there was an outpouring of international support. I remember watching the news, sympathetic for the victims of this terrifying crime and confounded that exercising our right to freedoms of expression could prove life-threatening. And I remember my mother, who like most mothers is genetically predisposed to watching threats on the news and creating a…

Letters from Paris: Students’ Stories of Terrorism

Letters from Paris:  Students’ Stories of Terrorism

Editors Note: John Sargent is a junior studying abroad in Paris, France during the Fall 2015 semester.  The clock on my phone read 4:34 A.M. as I laid down on the stiff wooden floor and balled up bath towels that served as my night’s bedding. Outside, the sirens continued to blare, and my mind was forced to consider the unimaginable as I faded into the fidgeting half-sleep that always seems to come after deep fear or deep confusion. The evening had begun as simply as any other; we were headed…

On Final Goodbyes and the Future of Journalism

On Final Goodbyes and the Future of Journalism

The state of journalism in the United States in general–not just on college campuses–is in crisis. Clickbait headlines from websites such as Upworthy and Buzzfeed incentivize writers to cater to buzz words and clichés instead of quality writing. In a stunning failure to keep up with the Internet, major publications and news networks are now trying to figure how to adapt to the future. Fearing the accusation of “liberal bias,” many approach the most important issues of the day with a “both sides are equally bad,” false equivalency that fails…

New London Elects New Mayor

New London Elects New Mayor

On Nov. 3, 2015, Democrat Michael Passero was elected to be the next Mayor of the City of New London. This comes nearly two months after the Democratic primary in September, when he defeated the incumbent mayor, Daryl Finizio. Both Finizio and Passero spoke separately with The College Voice. In early 2014, Finizio initially announced that he was not going to seek reelection as mayor. However, on the day after Election Day 2014, he announced his plans to run for a second term as mayor. He cited the city’s economic…